Granny Flower Square (Free Pattern)

Granny Flower Square (Free Pattern)

Are you one of those people who feel like you belong in another decade? Do you pine after the 1960’s and 1970’s styles that can’t be found except in vintage stores nowadays? If you’re one of the hippies or boho babes that would like to throw some older influences into your interior design, then you might want to take a look at this Granny Flower Square blanket from ByHaafner. Depending on which colors you choose, you can go completely retro with shades of brown, yellow, and orange, or you can take it even further back and do a 1960’s inspired blue, yellow, and green. Whichever colors you choose, it doesn’t take much, so this is a great project if you have a bunch of small skeins in your stash.

There are some pattern notes on this square and it would behoove you to read them over and make sure you understand before beginning. Planning out or experimenting beforehand can save a lot of time (and a headache) later. The specific notes are about beginning rounds (either chain two or make a double crochet, though the author does indicate that the chain two option is her preferred method) and joining (the pattern calls for a blunt needle in order to do this, or you can do a slip stitch, though the author writes that joining by needle is her go-to tactic).

To make a blanket out of Granny Flower Squares, you’ll need to measure out the surface you wish to cover (whether it’s used as a rug, blanket, or picnic surface) and do some simple math to figure it out. Each square is 4 x4 inches, and the original blanket is 285 squares total. Depending on the type of yarn you use (the pattern does not specify so this is up to you), you’ll need a corresponding hook. The hook used in the pattern was a 4mm size, so worsted weight yarn is a likely candidate.

After you’ve done the math, gathered your materials, and read over the instructions, you will be using the following stitches to make your Granny Flower Square: magic ring, slip stitch (sl st), chain (ch), double crochet (dc), space (sp), and treble crochet (tr). Most of these stitches are, of course, in a beginner’s repertoire, so this square should be easy for advanced crocheters and a good challenge for beginners. Joining the squares (should you choose to make more than one) simply requires a join-as-you-go stitch.

While there are written instructions for the Granny Flower Square, there is also a chart that illustrates which stitches go where. If you’ve never followed a chart (or seen one – I’ve mostly seen them used overseas), you may want to go through and figure out what each symbol stands for before you begin the project. You can, of course, share this pattern, but be sure and provide a link to the original so that the owner gets credit for her beautiful work.

If the Granny Flower Square looks like it might be your next project, you can find the written tutorial as well as the stitch chart at ByHaafner’s website. Groovy, baby.

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