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Embroider Your Own Tiny Objects Like This Cute Book

Embroidery December 8, 2017

I remember the first time I was blown away by embroidery. I was in the library looking for fairytale stories when I came across a book called The Starlight Princess & Other Princess Stories. I flipped through the pages and saw that every illustration had been crafted from embroidery. It was mesmerizing, enchanting even. I later purchased the book and have it in my collection to show to friends who are interested in the fibre arts as well as fairytales. It got me started on my embroidery journey, and though I am not an expert, it is a wonderful skill that allows me to explore my creative side and pair it with my love of stories.

A few weeks ago I discovered that Wild Olive had an embroidery pattern that would fit my skills as a beginner and allow me to showcase my love of stories — a little book! With just a few simple stitches, a tiny hoop, and minimal supplies, you can create the perfect present for the librophile in your life — your favorite librarian, teacher, sibling, grandparent, or child. You can also customize this little pattern using various colors and adding special little flourishes such as a ribbon bookmark.

To make the little book, you’ll need a small hoop, the free PDF pattern (you can download it from the Wild Olive site — she also has several other book patterns as well as a way to incorporate these into larger crafts), some embroidery fabric (I tend to use linen), a pair of fabric scissors, five colors of embroidery thread (one for the book, one for the pages, one for the eyes and mouth, and two for the designs. The original uses blue, white, green, red, and black, but you can go for varying shades, pastels, earth tones, etc.), an embroidery needle, and a pencil.

The pattern utilizes a simple stitch and some knots, so if you aren’t familiar with embroidery knots you may want to look up a stitch guide just to make sure you are making them correctly. Once you have your materials, you’ll need to trace the pattern onto the fabric. I usually put the pattern and fabric against a window and trace that way, but if you have a drafting table with a light that’s the best option. You can also tape the fabric and paper against the window to keep both your hands free.

When the pattern is transferred, you can pick which colors you are using and start embroidering. You’ll want to start with the outline of the book, then the pages, then the decoration and finally, the face. If you want to add anything such as a bookmark, plan out where to put that in as well — probably before the front of the book is embroidered as you will want to arrange the bookmark.

Wild Olive has several other embroidery patterns as well, so if you enjoy this project you might want to bookmark the site and peruse the other patterns at your leisure. You can find the small book pattern here

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Embroidery for Gardeners – Make Some Dangling Vegetables

Embroidery October 2, 2017

Embroidery for Gardeners - Make Some Dangling VegetablesEmbroidery for Gardeners - Make Some Dangling Vegetables

I love vegetables. I love growing them, preparing them, eating them, doodling them, and painting them. If you were to look at my notebooks you would find them full of doodles of carrots, potatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and radishes. And if you took a peek in my fridge, you’d see a host of them – celery, peppers, onions, carrots, and more. I don’t really know why I find them fascinating, but I do. So imagine my delight upon seeing these adorable miniature felt-and-embroidery vegetables! Veselka Bulkan’s creations are adorable, soft, and delightful. Of course, now that I’ve seen these, I want to try making them to adorn my own house.

To make your own felted veggies with embroidered leaves, you’ll need some crafting materials, including fabric (cotton or linen work best for me), felt (or wool if you’re going to make your own felt) in a variety of veggie colors (such as red, purple, green, and yellow), scissors, embroidery threads coordinating with your veggie colors, and a needle, and an embroidery hoop. If you’re planning on making your own felt, go ahead and make the felted vegetables first. You’ll join them to the embroidery upon completion. If you use store-bought felt (which is what I’ll be doing), sew up the vegetable shapes with the coordinating embroidery thread, stuff the veggies, and then go ahead and join them to the embroidered vegetation.

If you’re putting together a theme, try pairing things like onions, peppers, and tomatoes; carrots, potatoes and onions; or greens like kale, lettuce, and spinach. You could even make veggies using non-traditional colors, like the purple, white, and yellow carrots, or red onion, white onion, and yellow onion. You could also use blue, orange, and yellow together. Pick which colors resonate with you and if they aren’t normally the color of vegetable you want, try it out and see – you never know how beautiful the end project will be. If you’d rather use a limited palette, or go with pastels, branch out and try it. See what works, and when you’re done, post pictures of the final product. You never know who you will inspire.

Interested in miniature food and embroidery but don’t feel partial to vegetables? Not to worry. There are plenty of online tutorials for other foods such as pasta and breads, desserts, fruits, and snacks. You could also embroider berries, ferns, and other food found in the wild. Use your imagination and bring a miniature version of your favorite food to life. Pizza is totally an option.

Does this sound like a fun weekend craft for you? You can find all the foodie inspiration you’ll ever want at Apartment Therapy. If you want help crafting stitches for the foliage portion of the project, you can find it at Mary Corbet’s Needle & Thread. And if you’re new to embroidery, you can find a stitch library at Mollie Makes. Of course, if you’d rather just dive right in to the felted veggies and embroidery, you can take a peek at Veselka Bulkan’s array of beautiful vegetables and a DIY tutorial for felted veggies at Craft Gossip.

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Easy Embroidery Photo – Embroider a Family Portrait

Embroidery October 2, 2017

Easy Embroidered Photo - Try One! (1)

There are few things I love more than a good mashup. A combination of favorite things can only mean that they’re about to get better, together. That’s what I thought of when I saw this brilliant project – the mashup of two of my favorite hobbies, photography and embroidery. Instead of using oils to color the photos (I’ve seen it done a few times, especially with vintage photos), which can get messy, using brightly colored thread to add detail and whimsy to photos creates a 3-D effect, making the photo even more eye-catching. What’s not to love?

While there is plenty of inspiration online for embroidery on vintage photos, including artist Jose Romussi’s work, being able to work with family photos seems a little less intimidating and more rewarding, in the end. Especially if you are giving the embroidery project to a family member for a special occasion such as graduation, a housewarming present, or to celebrate the birth of a baby. Of course, you can choose whichever type of photo you prefer, and you don’t even have to stop at portraits. You could embroider an old family home, or the landscape of a favorite vacation spot, or a treasured family heirloom.

Whatever you decide to do with this project, and whatever you decide to use for it, you’ll need a few items to complete it: a black and white photo (you can alter photos on your computer or have them printed somewhere), scissors, sketching materials (colored pencils work best, as they will help you keep the colors separate and won’t run or bleed on the photo), a needle, and several colors of embroidery thread. You might also want an embroidery stitch visual handy in case you want to try different stitches, especially if you’re embroidering plants, clothes, or other items requiring a little more design.

Before you begin, you will also need to decide where and how you’re going to embroider the photo. Do you want to simply embroider a little color onto someone’s sweater, or the family pet? Do you want to add things to the photo like a bouquet or words or stars? Taking some time beforehand to plan out what you’re going to do will save you many headaches down the road. Try sketching on a piece of paper or print out a few copies of the photo so you can try out what you want to do ahead of time.

Does this project tickle your fancy? You can find a host of helpful tutorials and plenty of inspiration online, but I’ve collected some of my favorites for your benefit below. If you want inspiration for vintage photography and embroidery, do check out artist Jose Romussi’s work. You can also find plenty of ideas over at Craftsy – Sarah Barnes has a tutorial specifically for combining vintage photography and embroidery. If you want a look that’s simpler and has a “sketch” style to it, you can find a tutorial for that at Patchwork Posse. And if you just want an easy DIY tutorial for adding some color and 3-D effects to your family portraits, read through the incredibly helpful photo-and-written tutorial created by A Beautiful Mess.

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DIY your own Embroidery Pattern in this Cute geometrical Style

Embroidery October 2, 2017

DIY your own Embroidery Pattern in this Cute geometrical Style

If you’re a crafter like me, you enjoy looking at projects online and then making your own version without having to adhere to strict instructions. Having to read pages of steps, with or without pictures, is boring. But if someone gives me an idea and I can figure out how to make it my own? I love it. If that sounds like you, then let me introduce you to a DIY project you’ll fall in love with and want to do over and over.

DIY With Love’s Geometrical Animal Patterns is the perfect small project for the beginner embroiderer. You can choose any line drawing you want – doesn’t have to be an animal – and with just a few steps, you’ve got a pattern you can embroider in a rainbow of colors. It’s so easily customizable you might want to make yourself an entire zoo. These embroidery pieces would look fantastic in a sun room, nursery, or guest room. You can choose colors that coordinate with your decorating motifs, or you can choose to give these beauties away – they would make an excellent housewarming present.

To make your own geometrical pattern, simply choose a line drawing (you will need to print it out), and get some embroidery cloth, a pencil, and some tape. I don’t have a fancy light table, so I just tape the drawing behind the fabric and put it up against a window to trace. You can use chalk or a fabric pencil, but I prefer a regular pencil as the markings are clearer.

Once you’ve got the design transferred, you can break it up into geometric pieces if it isn’t already. Once you’re done with that step, you can start on the embroidery. I prefer using a hoop, but some people prefer the fabric to be loose, so find what works for you and do that. Remember, this is DIY so you do it how you like (and if you want a hoop, don’t feel like you have to stick with a circle hoop – there are ovals as well, and you can always find a square or rectangle if that’s your preference).

Embroidering can be a little tricky, so read up on embroidery stitches before you begin so you know the look you’re going for – and keep a thimble handy for those tough spots when the needle won’t go through without a little push. Other tools you might want nearby: scissors, extra needles, and a backing for the finished product (felt works, but you can also use interfacing).

If this sounds like a fun project, give it a go and create a bevy of beautiful creatures to decorate your (or your friend’s) space. You can find the instructions at DIY With Love (Google translate does a great job), as well as photos and a free template download. If you’ve never explored DIY With Love, I recommend them for inspiration and tutorials. They have everything from jewelry making, crochet, knitting, to woodworking and cooking recipes.

And if you’d rather take a gander at other embroidery projects before you begin, we’ve included several ideas down below.

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