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Make These Printable Pets!

Crafts November 17, 2017

Printable Pets

I have followed the evolution of printables for several years now. I signed up for Anne Vanture’s paper dollhouse minis ages ago because they were so detailed, adorable, and easy to make (if you want free printables for a range of dollhouse sizes, I highly recommend signing up for her monthly newsletter), and then it seemed as if the whole craft world imploded with ideas for printables.

Not all printables are created equal, however, and what you want to look for are high-quality, simple prints that can be printed on good quality paper. You may also want a specific kind of printable, so looking through Pinterest or other craft-heavy sites is a good idea.

Recently I was browsing through just such a website and I came across these absolutely adorable guinea pig printables. I’ve never had a guinea pig — I grew up with rabbits, cats, and dogs. But I had several friends who grew up taking care of their own guinea pigs and I’ve always thought them quite delightful. They’re like miniature pigs with their grunts and squeals, they’re soft, and they have quirky personalities. When you’re living in an apartment, however, or you have an older animal or one that wouldn’t get along particularly well with a guinea, you’ve got to resort to other measures — like printing out a few of these!

This is a great craft for older kids, as it does require some dexterity to fold and cut and tape these little guys together. But as long as you have patience and a good pair of scissors, you should be just fine. The first thing you’ll want to do for this project is make sure that you have good, strong paper, such as card stock. Print out the template using this paper and the guinea pigs will be sturdy enough to last quite a long time as long as they’re not handled too roughly.

You can of course experiment with the paper strength as well as color — if you want to make a rainbow family of guineas, go right ahead. The original post shows a photo of one of the guinea pigs that was printed with an earth tone paper, giving the little family a bit of diversity in coloring. This is a great way to use up ends of paper reams (some scrapbook paper is cardstock, but a floral family with regular scrapbook paper would also be cute).

Carefully cut and fold the template together. You can add mod podge over it if you want it to be even more sturdy. Once you’ve cut and folded all the templates, you can put them together for a family photo shoot. The more, the merrier.

These would make a fun craft for middle-school kids on a rainy day, or for someone who loves paper crafts. The guinea pig family can be arranged on a shelf, in a cardboard box “cage”, or in an old goldfish tank. However you decide to display them, and whatever you use them for, they will be cute and cuddly forever. And you don’t even have to worry about feeding them or changing their bedding!

If you want to make your own family of guinea pigs, you can find the template with photos and instructions on The Craft Train.

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You Won’t Lose Your Marbles With This Wrapped Pendant Tutorial

Beading November 17, 2017

You Won't Lose Your Marbles With This Wrapped Pendant Tutorial

If you’re a crafter, chances are you have a bag, a box, or a drawer full of marbles that you don’t know how to use. They’re fun when you’re a kid, but when you’re grown, how do you incorporate them into anything other than a game? Well, Arty Zen Studios has the answer: you can turn these marbles into lovely pendants. A few simple wire wrapping techniques and supplies and your favorite marbles and a few hours of your day and you’ll have a whole set of jewelry to wear or give away to your friends and family members.

What I love about this project is that it isn’t expensive, it teaches you a new technique, and it’s so easy that you can easily make them as gifts for teachers, mothers, siblings, cousins, and co-workers. They’re delicate enough that people will love them, unique enough that people will notice, and inexpensive enough that they won’t break the bank. This is a great project to do when you need to get through a stash — make an assembly line and get to work.

To make your own marble pendants, you’ll need the following tools: a ruler, flush cutters, round nose, medium stepper, chain nose and flat nose pliers, a sharpie or marker, and a wire straightener. The pliers will usually come together in a kit and are well worth the investment, especially if you’re going to be making a lot of wire jewelry.

Materials for the project include wire, marbles, and a cord for the necklace. The tutorial suggests using 20 and 22 gauge metal-plated wire. You can use gold, silver, copper, etc. Just be sure that the wire is thick enough to be a sturdy enclosure for the marble, but light enough that you can bend it with the pliers.

You’ll need to cut bits of wire and mark them with the sharpie. Bind them together and then bend into the shape of a spiderweb. This is when you’ll add the marble. Be sure and position it so that it is in the middle and not off to the side, as this will create problems later. Keep the marble centered as you bend the wire over and around it, forming the cage. After that, you will twirl each piece of wire into a spiral — there should be six total. This will create the elegant top of the casing. Then you’ll create a loop with the last two strands of wire, which you can affix to a cord for the necklace.

You can adjust the wire as you go, which makes this a forgiving project for beginners. Don’t worry about the spacing since it can be altered later. Concentrate on ensuring the marble is centered in the “spiderweb” and that the spirals are made so that the excess wire can be trimmed to avoid scratching the wearer.

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want more jewelry tips, you can bookmark Arty Zen Studios or follow them on Facebook. There’s also an Etsy shop if you’d care to peruse their beautiful creations. You can find the tutorial for this pendant on the blog at Arty Zen Studios.

462 total views, 5 today

Keep Warm While Traveling With This Crocheted Wanderlust Scarf

Crochet November 17, 2017

Kirsten Holloway’s Wanderlust scarf might be the most beautiful, luxurious, comfortable scarf I have ever seen. I’m currently scouring nearby shops to see if I can find yarn I love enough to use for this pattern. While the scarf looks like it belongs in a fancy boutique, it is considered an easy pattern with repetitive rows, which means that even if you’re a crochet beginner, you shouldn’t find this pattern too difficult to tackle. The most important thing is to read the pattern beforehand, learn the stitches you may not be familiar with, and then take the pattern one step at a time.

One of the best things about this scarf pattern is that it comes in both a long scarf version and an infinity scarf version, and if you still can’t get enough, there’s a beanie version so you can make a complete set. These would make excellent gifts for friends and family members, especially if made in their favorite colors.

To make one of these beautiful scarves, you’ll need to collect the following: a size “I” crochet hook, 350-375 yards of Lion Brand Heartland yarn, a yarn needle, and a pair of scissors. The stitches used in the crochet pattern include chain (ch), single crochet (sc), half double crochet (hdc), double crochet (dc), front post double crochet (FP dc) and back post double crochet (BP dc). There’s also a special stitch: half double crochet in the third loop (hdc in 3rd loop), but the pattern walks you through it clearly and concisely.

If you’re wanting to check the gauge, you can do so by crocheting thirteen double crochet stitches and then measuring to make sure the swatch is about four inches. The entire scarf should measure about six feet once complete, with a width of six inches. Of course if you’re making the infinity scarf, it will be a little different as you’ll be crocheting in the round. There are instructions for the infinity scarf just below the original pattern.

After you’ve completed the scarf, you can decide whether you want to include extras like tassels or fringe. There are steps to do that as well beneath the pattern. Personally I think the scarf looks great either way, though I do have a penchant for fringe. Without the fringe it looks more boutique, but with the fringe it carries a more cozy vibe.

Does this sound like a project you’d enjoy? You can find the tutorial for the regular scarf and infinity scarf on Kirsten Holloway Designs, as well as the tutorial for the beanie. The tutorials are free, but if you’d prefer an ad-free pattern you can purchase one from Kirsten’s Ravelry store. If you want to keep up with the latest designs and patterns, you can follow her on Facebook, Ravelry, Instagram, and Pinterest. You might also want to bookmark her website — she has a section for Crochet-A-Longs, which provides a work-along tutorial, and if you have a question you can post it on her Facebook page. This year’s project is the Art ‘n Soul Scrappy Scarf, which looks like plenty of fun wrapped up in an easy-to-make package.

1889 total views, 16 today

These Paper Mache Cups Make The Perfect Centerpiece For Your Next Tea Party

Crafts November 17, 2017

Paper Mache Cups

I’ve long been a fan of paper mache and the beautiful, whimsical creations that arise from it, but have never been able to sit down and make something out of it for myself. However, upon finding this helpful tutorial and gorgeous photos from Ann Wood, I might just have to make some time and put some of these delicate cups together for my next tea party.

If you’re new to paper mache, it is quite a forgiving medium. Nothing has to be perfect. You work at your own pace. And the materials are cheap. It’s a great skill to learn for 3-D art, and there’s plenty of inspiration to find online, particularly on Pinterest. I’ve pinned a few dozen paper mache projects (including animals, dollhouse furniture, and jewelry) and am looking forward to giving this craft a go.

Whether you’re an old hat at this or are beginning your journey into paper mache, these teacups are a great project. There’s a template available from Ann Wood, along with a written tutorial and plenty of photos for the step-by-step process. To make your own teacup (or set), you’ll need the following materials: a template, paste (Ann recommends wallpaper paste), cardboard (thin like cereal and cracker boxes as well as thicker pieces from pizza boxes or Amazon packages), newspaper, scotch tape (invisible isn’t necessary), glue, a pencil, an exacto knife, scissors, and whatever you’ll be using to decorate the teacups, such as scrapbook paper, mod podge, magazine clippings, stickers, fabric, ribbon, etc.

Once you’ve gathered the materials, you’ll need a large, clean work space. Remember to wear older clothes that you don’t mind getting messy. Paper mache is for people who like to work with their hands and enjoy getting them dirty. Use the template to cut out your teacup and then slowly turn and tape it into the teacup shape. You can make a handle or not, as you choose. Ann suggests not using paper mache on the handle. You only need one layer, but if you prefer a chunkier teacup, add a few more.

After the paper mache, you can decorate the cup (and add the handle). You can use paint, markers, pastels, whatever suits your fancy. Allow for plenty of drying time between layers, or, if you’re using acrylic, keep some water nearby to refresh your brushes and keep the paint from drying too quickly.

What do you do with these teacups? Well, you can use them as a centerpiece for your next tea party, but they can also be used for other things, like a jewelry case (put your earrings or rings inside), a paperweight to hold your paperclips, a tree ornament for the holidays, as containers for your tea bags, or as organizers for your craft notions. There are dozens of ways to utilize these pretty paper cups, and they also make great gifts — just fill with tea, chocolates, or potpourri and you have a present perfect for friends, family members, teachers, and co-workers.

If you do end up making one or several of these beauties, Ann would enjoy seeing them! You can upload them to Flickr or leave a link in the comments. You can find all the instructions and photos at Ann Wood’s Handmade site. Happy crafting!

288 total views, 5 today

Use A Bead Spinner To Make These Cuff Bracelets

Beading, Crafts November 17, 2017

Use A Bead Spinner To Make These Cuff Bracelets

I remember when technology was not as advanced as it is now — I had to string tiny beads one or two at a time and hope I didn’t move too much in case they popped off whatever I was making. However, now that we are in the 21st century, there is such a thing as a bead spinner. The bead spinner is a simple device (sometimes wooden) that allows you to string tiny beads in mere seconds. Amazing, right? Just think of all the possibilities!

Instead of spending hours on one cuff bracelet, you can make 3-5 in that time. The bead spinner cuts time so you can concentrate on more important aspects of the bracelet, such as color, size, and accents. The Art Bead Scene has a post about making these beautiful cuffs that also includes a video tutorial if you’re interested in how to use the bead spinner to speed up your creation process.

If you’re wanting to make one of these gorgeous cuffs for yourself or a friend, you’ll need to purchase the following items (or locate them in your stash): memory wire (the tutorial recommends 3-5 loops unless you want a smaller or larger size than the original), seed beads (peanut beads and seed beads work the best — try different color combinations such as metallic and earth tones, or royal tones with black), a decorative headpin (optional), a charm (optional — you can purchase pewter, steel, or whatever metal-plated charm suits your color scheme), and a few jump rings. You’ll also need to have pliers (round and chain nose), wire cutters (the tutorial recommends that you use the specific memory wire cutters as the material is different and more difficult to work with if you are using regular wire cutters), and a bead spinner (The Art Bead Scene recommends the Spin-N-Bead).

Once you’ve gathered your tools and materials, you’ll need an area in which to work. First form a loop at the end of the memory wire so that the beads won’t slide off while you’re assembling. Then put your seed beads in the spinner and insert the memory wire. Watch the video beforehand so you know what to expect. This should take just a few minutes. Decide where you want your headpin, bead accents and charm(s) and then attach them to the cuff using the jump rings. And there you are — a fashionable cuff bracelet to wear and show off at parties, work, and during the holidays.

These bracelets would make great gifts for friends during special occasions such as holidays, weddings, and anniversaries. They would also be appreciated by teachers, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, and nieces (of course, there are also men who enjoy cuff bracelet jewelry, particularly younger men — maybe your brother, nephew, or son would enjoy one!).

If you would like to watch the video tutorial for the bead spinner or walk through the instructions for the cuff bracelet, you can find them both on the Art Bead Scene blog. It’s also worth bookmarking The Art Bead Scene (they’ve moved to Art Bead Scene Studio) for their monthly challenges, free project tutorials, and inspirational photography.

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DIY Birdhouse … or Bird Trailer

Crafts October 6, 2017

DIY Birdhouse ... or Bird Trailer

My family loves birds. My grandma and grandpa live in the hills between North and South Carolina, and when I call I always ask my grandparents what birds have been around. They usually have chickadees, wrens, cardinals, and tufted titmouses (which happen to be my favorite). My dad loves hummingbirds and has several feeders on the front porch. There’s a feeder out back for the less exotic birds, and we keep an eye on it to make sure the squirrels aren’t hogging it. My in-laws have several houses and feeders, as well as stands for the birds they care for, even going so far as to avoid the corner of the porch where a wren nested for a couple seasons and had a batch or two of babies. I also have several friends that love birds, and we’ve spotted several beautiful varieties while traveling.

With so many bird lovers around me, I’m surprised that I’ve never built a birdhouse for one of them. I painted a birdhouse once at camp, but other than that I haven’t spent any time working on that particular craft. However, this little project just might change my mind. What’s cuter than a vintage-inspired birdhouse? This specific one is modeled after 40’s and 50’s campers, which has become very popular in the last several years. And what’s not to love? It’s a fun shape, it’s two tone with happy, bright colors, and the details make it pop.

Even if you don’t have the woodworking tools to cut your own pieces for this trailer, or you don’t have access to sheets of aluminum, or recycled materials, there are options if you still want this birdhouse for your backyard or a shelf in your home or the front porch. Of course, you can purchase the trailer already made, but sometimes it’s more fun to put it together yourself, especially if it’s going to be something an animal lives inside.

Of course, if you have the woodworking know-how, all you need to do is create a blueprint and choose the wood you want to work with. You can go to a craft store and pick up some balsa wood, or you can try some pine or other soft wood. With some heavy-duty tools, you should be able to create the pieces in an afternoon. After that, you’ll need to attach them to each other with a strong glue, and then you can decide whether you want to varnish the outside or paint it. If you’re going to keep it inside, you could use something like chalkboard paint and decorate it with doodles and quotes. You can also put it on a stand and wrap it in Christmas lights. You can also hang it on a rafter, or put it out on the front porch, or you can use it as the base of another project, like a centerpiece for the table.

If this sounds like something right up your alley, you can make your own after looking at the inspiration below. If you’d rather buy one pre-made, you can find them on Etsy. Or, you can buy a kit and put it together yourself. There’s one available for purchase on Bird Folk Collective.

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Make this Satin Ribbon Dahlia

Ribbon Art October 6, 2017

Make this Satin Ribbon Dahlia

When I was young, I loved tissue paper flowers. I would grab whatever extra tissue paper we had, some pipe cleaners, and settle down in a corner and put together a bouquet of beautiful, fragile flowers. I believe someone gave me a book with various shapes to try, but I ended up making a lot of tulips. The only trouble with tissue paper flowers, however, is that no matter how pretty they are, they are extremely fragile and do not travel well. I don’t think I have a single one left between all my moves.

However, I did discover that there are other ways to make pretty flowers, and they hold up much better and can be used for many more things than the tissue paper flowers. Tulle flowers can be pretty, especially as hairbows for tiny children, but they can get ragged and tear. Ribbon, however, is often sturdier, and will last a long time. Ribbon is also a much better material for a wide age range, and can be used for other things, not just fashion accessories. You can decorate with them – on pillows, as a garland for a Christmas tree, as a centerpieces for Easter, etc. You can adorn your bags, coats, and scarves with them. They can be placed on cards, used as bookmarks, and added to other craft projects like embroidery.

The Ribbon Retreat has the perfect beginner project for someone like me, with little experience working with ribbon. Their Satin Ribbon Dahlia is gorgeous, perfect for a gift or addition to another project. To make the dahlia, you’ll need the following materials: 2 yards of satin ribbon (you can use any size – the pattern suggests using 1 1/2″ ribbon but does mention you can use another size if you want to go bigger or smaller than the original), a gem (the pattern suggests using a pearl), a needle, a thread, a clip (a barrette would work as well), a felt circle (try to match or coordinate with the color of the ribbon you chose), a lighter, and a hot glue gun with plenty of glue.

You’ll need to measure your ribbon, then sew a zig-zag pattern in the ribbon. Secure at the end with a knot and then gather from the other end. The ribbon will bunch up and start resembling petals. Just remember that if you don’t use quilting quality thread, you will need to go slowly and not yank, as you could break the thread and then have to start over. You may have to re-thread your needle a few times. Remember to gather as you go. Once you’re done, you can start wrapping in a circle, adding a dab of hot glue every so often so it stays in place. Glue the gem in the middle, add the felt and clip to the back, and voila! You now have a beautiful ribbon dahlia to adorn whatever you please.

Does this sound like a project you’d love to try? You can find the full written and photo tutorial at The Ribbon Retreat. You can also purchase supplies there, including ribbon and gems. If you don’t like using ribbon, of course, there are other, just as sturdy options, including rickrack and felt flowers.

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Free Cross-Stitch Patterns

Cross-Stitch October 2, 2017

Free Cross-Stitch Patterns

I have friends, a husband and wife, who cross stitch together. They buy the beautiful kits with thousands of stitches and when it’s complete, it is a work of art. I love that they have a craft they do together, and that they give to their families as a gift. Unfortunately for me, I don’t have the time or patience to undertake such a project. I’m the type of person who will freehand designs or follow a small design, but beyond that, you can forget it. There are some small kits available, but I often find them expensive, and instead have to make up my own patterns as I go, which can go well until I get confused about which color I want where, how big the final project will be, and exactly how to get the shape I’m going for. That’s where Country Living comes in and saves the day.

I wasn’t aware that Country Living had such a thriving craft section to their website, but after scrolling through several patterns, I got really excited about the possibilities. These are smaller, more manageable patterns, easy to print out on your home printer, and simple enough that you won’t need two dozen different shades of the same color. Whether you’re looking for vintage inspiration, cute ideas, or more modern projects, Country Living has it all.

There are several Americana projects, such as a red barn, a white silo, and vegetation like trees with autumn foliage or various seeds and nuts. There are patterns with a summer vibe, like the bicycle and glass of lemonade. There are also unique patterns like oars, china patterns, and a cute little mailbox. Also available are animals, holiday patterns, and a map of the United States in miniature. If you can think of it, Country Living probably has a pattern for it.

This might be a good way to try out something new, something a little more challenging for yourself, like using different colors of fabric, or adding seed beads (the autumn leaves would look gorgeous with glass beads added in), or even buttons, lace, and ribbon. You could even add embroidery techniques, such as knots, various types of stitching, and single color embroidery thread. A simple pattern means you can tailor and embellish to suit your own inclinations without having to worry that you’re going to mess it up somehow and have to take it out or, heaven forbid, start over.

If you’re interested in trying out one or more of these adorable cross stitch patterns, you can view a library of them by visiting Country Living’s website (see a sample of their offerings down below). I particularly love the bicycle, the glass of lemonade, and the tree with autumn foliage. Be sure and look at the other subjects Country Living posts about, because there are several other topics that might be of interest to you, including other crafts, food and drink, holiday decorations, and house/intererior design. Their photos are all pinnable (if you use Pinterest), and you can follow them on various social media including YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

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Embroidery for Gardeners – Make Some Dangling Vegetables

Embroidery October 2, 2017

Embroidery for Gardeners - Make Some Dangling VegetablesEmbroidery for Gardeners - Make Some Dangling Vegetables

I love vegetables. I love growing them, preparing them, eating them, doodling them, and painting them. If you were to look at my notebooks you would find them full of doodles of carrots, potatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, and radishes. And if you took a peek in my fridge, you’d see a host of them – celery, peppers, onions, carrots, and more. I don’t really know why I find them fascinating, but I do. So imagine my delight upon seeing these adorable miniature felt-and-embroidery vegetables! Veselka Bulkan’s creations are adorable, soft, and delightful. Of course, now that I’ve seen these, I want to try making them to adorn my own house.

To make your own felted veggies with embroidered leaves, you’ll need some crafting materials, including fabric (cotton or linen work best for me), felt (or wool if you’re going to make your own felt) in a variety of veggie colors (such as red, purple, green, and yellow), scissors, embroidery threads coordinating with your veggie colors, and a needle, and an embroidery hoop. If you’re planning on making your own felt, go ahead and make the felted vegetables first. You’ll join them to the embroidery upon completion. If you use store-bought felt (which is what I’ll be doing), sew up the vegetable shapes with the coordinating embroidery thread, stuff the veggies, and then go ahead and join them to the embroidered vegetation.

If you’re putting together a theme, try pairing things like onions, peppers, and tomatoes; carrots, potatoes and onions; or greens like kale, lettuce, and spinach. You could even make veggies using non-traditional colors, like the purple, white, and yellow carrots, or red onion, white onion, and yellow onion. You could also use blue, orange, and yellow together. Pick which colors resonate with you and if they aren’t normally the color of vegetable you want, try it out and see – you never know how beautiful the end project will be. If you’d rather use a limited palette, or go with pastels, branch out and try it. See what works, and when you’re done, post pictures of the final product. You never know who you will inspire.

Interested in miniature food and embroidery but don’t feel partial to vegetables? Not to worry. There are plenty of online tutorials for other foods such as pasta and breads, desserts, fruits, and snacks. You could also embroider berries, ferns, and other food found in the wild. Use your imagination and bring a miniature version of your favorite food to life. Pizza is totally an option.

Does this sound like a fun weekend craft for you? You can find all the foodie inspiration you’ll ever want at Apartment Therapy. If you want help crafting stitches for the foliage portion of the project, you can find it at Mary Corbet’s Needle & Thread. And if you’re new to embroidery, you can find a stitch library at Mollie Makes. Of course, if you’d rather just dive right in to the felted veggies and embroidery, you can take a peek at Veselka Bulkan’s array of beautiful vegetables and a DIY tutorial for felted veggies at Craft Gossip.

442 total views, 1 today

Easy Embroidery Photo – Embroider a Family Portrait

Embroidery October 2, 2017

Easy Embroidered Photo - Try One! (1)

There are few things I love more than a good mashup. A combination of favorite things can only mean that they’re about to get better, together. That’s what I thought of when I saw this brilliant project – the mashup of two of my favorite hobbies, photography and embroidery. Instead of using oils to color the photos (I’ve seen it done a few times, especially with vintage photos), which can get messy, using brightly colored thread to add detail and whimsy to photos creates a 3-D effect, making the photo even more eye-catching. What’s not to love?

While there is plenty of inspiration online for embroidery on vintage photos, including artist Jose Romussi’s work, being able to work with family photos seems a little less intimidating and more rewarding, in the end. Especially if you are giving the embroidery project to a family member for a special occasion such as graduation, a housewarming present, or to celebrate the birth of a baby. Of course, you can choose whichever type of photo you prefer, and you don’t even have to stop at portraits. You could embroider an old family home, or the landscape of a favorite vacation spot, or a treasured family heirloom.

Whatever you decide to do with this project, and whatever you decide to use for it, you’ll need a few items to complete it: a black and white photo (you can alter photos on your computer or have them printed somewhere), scissors, sketching materials (colored pencils work best, as they will help you keep the colors separate and won’t run or bleed on the photo), a needle, and several colors of embroidery thread. You might also want an embroidery stitch visual handy in case you want to try different stitches, especially if you’re embroidering plants, clothes, or other items requiring a little more design.

Before you begin, you will also need to decide where and how you’re going to embroider the photo. Do you want to simply embroider a little color onto someone’s sweater, or the family pet? Do you want to add things to the photo like a bouquet or words or stars? Taking some time beforehand to plan out what you’re going to do will save you many headaches down the road. Try sketching on a piece of paper or print out a few copies of the photo so you can try out what you want to do ahead of time.

Does this project tickle your fancy? You can find a host of helpful tutorials and plenty of inspiration online, but I’ve collected some of my favorites for your benefit below. If you want inspiration for vintage photography and embroidery, do check out artist Jose Romussi’s work. You can also find plenty of ideas over at Craftsy – Sarah Barnes has a tutorial specifically for combining vintage photography and embroidery. If you want a look that’s simpler and has a “sketch” style to it, you can find a tutorial for that at Patchwork Posse. And if you just want an easy DIY tutorial for adding some color and 3-D effects to your family portraits, read through the incredibly helpful photo-and-written tutorial created by A Beautiful Mess.

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