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Try These Knee Highs On For Size (free crochet pattern)

Crochet December 8, 2017

Try These Knee Highs On For Size (free crochet pattern)

I always get really excited when I find knee highs. There’s something about long socks that makes me feel fancier — and they keep you warmer, especially if they’re under jeans. Cold jeans are the worst. It has been more difficult to find thick, comfy knee highs of late, but I discovered the other day that there are quite a few free crochet patterns for knee highs, which is great since I don’t knit often and find the thought of using four or six needles at a time quite intimidating.

The Lavender Chair’s knee high socks not only look comfortable, but they are stylish as well — I would want to show them off with a fun skirt or a pair of shorts in the springtime. Whether you’re looking to make some delicate knee highs for a special occasion or a pair of rugged knee highs for mountain wear, this pattern is easy to customize with various yarns and stitches.

If you’re a beginner crocheter, this might be a little difficult, but it’s worth a shot. Just remember to read the entire pattern beforehand, learn whatever stitches you didn’t know before (or practice the ones you don’t have much practice with), and go slowly. The pattern says it’s for intermediate crocheters, but you’ll never get past beginner status if you stick with beginner projects. So if you’re new to crochet and still want to dive in, I say go for it. The pattern has several sizes available, so you might want to write out the changes if you’re going up a size.

You’ll need to gather some supplies, including worsted weight yarn, a size “I” crochet hook, scissors, and a tapestry needle. If you want to check the gauge, crochet 8 half double crochet stitches and check to make sure it measures 2 inches. As far as stitches go, you’ll need to know the following: chain (ch), slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc), double crochet (dc), half double crochet (hdc), chain space (ch sp), decrease (dec), and v-stitch.

There are various sections of the sock that you will need to pay close attention to, such as the heel, cuff, and toe. As long as you’ve read the pattern over beforehand and are willing to slow down if it gets confusing, you will be able to make these stunning socks. The finished product would make an excellent gift for friends or family. Depending on how comfortable you are with the pattern you could also re-size it to make presents for children.

If you’re making these for the first time it might be wise to stick to a single color, but of course when you get more comfortable with the pattern you may want to branch out and explore options like adding ribbon, buttons, and lace, or various colors.

Do these look like they belong in your wardrobe? Do you know someone that loves a good pair of knee highs? Then you’ll want to make sure you have ready access to the free Valerie’s Knee High Crochet Socks pattern from The Lavender Chair. You can also sign up for her newsletter for access to hundreds of free crochet patterns.

3399 total views, 96 today

Make This Car Seat Cloak To Keep Your Kid Cozy (free crochet pattern)

Crochet December 8, 2017

Car Seat Cloak

If you live anywhere near cold weather, you know the unpleasant feeling of slipping into a cold seat. No matter how many layers you have on, your back gets chilly, your legs get clammy, and your whole body tenses at the cold. Little children may not realize how cold they are, but the rest of us are very aware of just how much heat we’re losing. Luckily, at least for the kids, there’s another option — the car seat cloak (though you may want to adapt this pattern and make one for yourself). Sure, it’s one more layer, but it’s a thick, cozy, layer that will protect your little ones from the chill while you wait for the car to warm up.

The Car Seat Cloak is a free crochet pattern that you can save to your queues on Ravelry and Pinterest, but there is also an ad-free version available for $2.00 (USD). You can also follow Left In Knots on her website, Facebook page, Pinterest, and Instagram. If you love free crochet patterns, then you should definitely add her links to your bookmarks. You can also sign up to receive her free newsletter if you’d rather get free patterns sent to your inbox.

What’s so nice about the cloak is that it can be used with a toddler-size carseat. Toddlers aren’t supposed to wear thick jackets in car seats because of safety hazards, which leaves these little ones cold in the wintertime. With the car seat cloak, you can slip it over them and the car seat and avoid getting the chills. (Of course, you could buy a car seat cloak, but where the fun in that when you can customize it with your child’s favorite colors?)

To make your own car seat cloak, you’ll need eight skeins of yarn (the pattern suggests using something like Vanna’s Choice), a size “H” crochet hook, scissors, and a tapestry needle. If you want to follow the pattern exactly you’ll need six skeins of yarn in one color and one in each of the other two colors, but of course you can mix it up and do an ombre, chevron, or one color cloak as well.

This pattern is excellent for beginner crocheters, as the only stitches required are the magic ring, chain (ch), single crochet (sc), half double crochet (hdc), slip stitch (sl st), and reverse single crochet (rsc) — also known as the crab stitch. If you’re concerned about the gauge, you can check it by crocheting 14 half double crochet stitches for 10 rows and then measuring it — it should equal about 4 square inches.

If you want to make these to sell, you can do so but you must link back to the original pattern and give credit to the designer. Is this something your little one needs to keep warm in the winter? Or do you want to make one for yourself (there are notes on how to do this in the pattern)? You can find the original free crochet pattern with video links to tutorials (for the magic ring, for instance), as well as a link to the PDF for sale, at Left In Knots.

2583 total views, 166 today

Owl I Want For Christmas Is This Super Scarf (crochet patterns)

Crochet December 8, 2017

Owl I Want For Christmas Is This Super Scarf (crochet patterns)

When “super scarves” started becoming a thing I got excited. There’s nothing cozier than a huge scarf that you can wrap half your body in while running errands or playing outside in the snow. What makes these scarves even better is when they include animals in the design, and I don’t think there has been a more popular animal in the last couple decades than the owl. Whether it’s due to the Harry Potter series, the Pinterest hipsters, or propaganda from the owl community itself, I’m thrilled that people continue to incorporate these wise birds into wearable designs.

While some of us may glance longingly at the complicated patterns we’ve found on Pinterest, the free pattern from Repeat Crafter Me is great for those of us who aren’t quite comfortable with the “advanced” label but have progressed beyond “beginner”. So if you’re in the intermediate area of crochet, like myself, this should be easy enough that you don’t feel overwhelmed, but challenging enough that you feel really proud of yourself once it’s done!

In order to make your own Crochet Owl Super Scarf, you’ll need 9-10 skeins of yarn (the pattern suggests using Bernat Softee Chunky in a variety of colors). If you want to go subtle you can use shades of the same color, but if you want to go bold, I highly recommend using the suggested colors or at least choosing a bright color for the body of the scarf.

Apart from crochet you’ll also be sewing the two sides of the scarf together and making pom-poms for the owls’ feet. If you haven’t made pom-poms, there is a handy video tutorial available on the pattern page. For the crochet sections, you’ll need to know the following stitches: Magic Ring, chain (ch), single crochet (sc), double crochet (dc), slip stitch (sl st), chain space (ch sp), half double crochet (hdc), and v-stitch. You’ll also need to know the mattress stitch to use when sewing the owl together and joining the scarf halves.

If you are unfamiliar with the mattress stitch, or need some reminders about various stitches, YouTube and Pinterest are super helpful in this regard. Just remember to save the pins you used so you can reference them later for other projects.

Once you’re done with the owl scarf, be sure and show it off! It makes a fabulous gift for an owl-lover in your life, whether they’re a parent, grandparent, kid, cousin, or sibling (or yourself). If you end up using this pattern, Repeat Crafter Me wants to see it — tag @RepeatCrafterMe and @Yarnspirations in your Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest posts.

Are super scarves your new thing? Then you’ll definitely want to check out the Super Scarf Guide, which has new free patterns, tutorials, and more(Check back here soon because we’ll be posting about a bunch of free animal super scarf crochet patterns to make and share). You can sign up for access on the Repeat Crafter Me site. First things first, though. You can find the free pattern for this Owl Super Scarf, along with plenty of photos and a video tutorial on the Repeat Crafter Me site. You can also share it and print out the pattern using the links at the bottom of the page.

1132 total views, 491 today

Shrug This Sweater On — A Free Beginner Crochet Pattern

Crochet December 8, 2017

Shrug This Sweater On -- A Free Beginner Crochet Pattern

Making your own clothing can be intimidating. I remember spending several hours sewing, knitting, and crocheting only to be extremely frustrated that my skills didn’t match my ambitions. I tried to make dresses, skirts, and pajamas for myself and realized I needed to dial it back and stick with hats, scarves, and socks. However, I’ve never given up hope that one day I’ll be able to make my own sweater, and with this free pattern from the Make & Do Crew, I just might be able to pull it off. Or shrug it on.

While the Make & Do Crew recommend the Lionbrand “Jeans” yarn, you can use any medium weight yarn for this sweater shrug. You’ll need 5-7 skeins (depending on sizing), and if you want you can switch up the colors for an ombre effect, choose two colors for contrast, or make the whole thing in one color. The other materials you’ll want to gather for the project are a size “I” crochet hook, stitch markers, a tapestry needle, and scissors.

If you’re still concerned about being a beginner and starting what looks like an ambitious project, let me put your mind at ease. There are no complicated stitch patterns to learn. All the terminology you need to know are chain (ch), single crochet (sc), double crochet (dc), double crochet in back loop only (dc in blo), skip (sk), space (sp), chain 1 space (ch 1 sp), right side (RS), wrong side (WS), turning chain (tch), repeat (rep), main color (mc), and accent color (ac). With only four stitches to know (all of which are common in beginner patterns) and self-explanatory terminology, this project practically makes itself.

You will want to check the gauge, however, since you’ll be wearing this shrug once it’s completed. For eight rows of double crochet, it should measure four inches. It’s also a good idea to check as you go that it will fit the way you want it to. Alterations can always be made as you progress, but rarely once the project is complete.

If you are making this for someone else (a friend, a sibling, a parent, etc.), you might need to take their measurements beforehand to ensure the perfect fit. The nice thing about this shrug is that it can be made to fit anybody. The original sizes are S/M and L/XL, but there are notes in the pattern that allow for customization, including the width and length of the shrug.

There is some sewing, as the shrug is joined by seaming the body and sleeves together. If you are not familiar with the stitch used in this project (the mattress stitch), there is a link provided that will show you how to complete this part of the pattern. Take it slow, practice a little beforehand if you’re unfamiliar with this technique, and don’t worry about it too much, as it isn’t the showy part of the shrug.

If you decide that you enjoy making sweaters, there are several other free patterns available from the Make & Do Crew as well, including the The Dwell Sweater, the Navajo Shrug, and the Campfire Cardigan, all of which have links on the free pattern page. You can find the original free Lightweight + Easy Crochet Shrug Pattern on the Make & Do Crew’s site.

29 total views, 1 today

These Crocheted Hand Warmers Will Keep You Warm On Winter Nights

Crochet December 8, 2017

These Crocheted Hand Warmers Will Keep You Warm On Winter Nights

Yesterday I was at the store ostensibly to purchase felt and thread when I spied the yarn aisle and had to take a stroll and feel all the beautiful yarn. I of course had to purchase two skeins of soft yarn in navy and gold, and though I didn’t know what I was going to do with it, I knew I wanted to make something cozy for winter. When I got home I looked on Pinterest for ideas and found these beautiful hand warmers. They’re beautiful, warm, and small enough that I can probably make them in a few hours. I’m planning to sit by the fire and listen to an Agatha Christie audiobook while I crochet.

With something like these hand warmers, there are a myriad of free patterns available, but what drew me to this particular pattern was the simplicity of the pattern and the fun added touch of the buttons. They’re soft, elegant, and will go with anything I wear when I have to duck out for some soup ingredients. This is a great pattern for beginners, and if it’s a pattern you enjoy, you can make several pair of hand warmers in very little time. They would make great stocking stuffers for Christmas, or a lovely present for teachers, co-workers, grandparents, parents, kids, and neighbors (the pattern comes in sizes from baby to adult).

Slugs On The Refrigerator’s pattern for these hand warmers was part of their Crochet Camp program, and if you want more patterns from them, I recommend bookmarking the site and checking back often. This particular pattern is available as a free PDF, and has plenty of pictures to illustrate the puff stitch used in a major portion of the pattern. If you haven’t tried puff stitch yet, try it out before attempting the hand warmers. It’s a great stitch to learn and one of my favorites, but it did take a little time for me to master.

Making a pair of these handwarmers requires some DK weight yarn (the pattern suggests using wool), a 4mm crochet hook, 2 buttons (1 cm diameter), and some scissors. The only stitches you need to know are the chain (ch), single crochet (sc), slip stitch (sl st), and puff stitch. Yarn over and chain space are also used in this pattern.

With only 9 rounds for the hand and 3 for the wrist, this project won’t take very long, especially after you get the hang of the puff stitch. You’ll be creating a loop for the buttons near the end, and once you’re finished with the crocheting you can weave in the ends and attach the buttons. Experiment with different types of yarn (wool can be a bit scratchy, but some others will not be as warm), various colors (variegated yarn vs royal tones or pastels), and buttons (toggles, wooden buttons, square buttons, etc.). Each pair of handwarmers can be unique and special to the wearer whether you’re making a pair of these handwarmers for yourself or a few pair for the family.

If you’d like to make these cozy crocheted handwarmers, you can find a link to the free PDF on Slugs On The Refrigerator.

28 total views, 0 today

These Free Pokemon Cross-Stitch Patterns Will Make You Want To Catch Them All

Cross-Stitch December 8, 2017

These Free Pokemon Cross-Stitch Patterns Will Make You Want To Catch Them All

I grew up in a community that was averse to trends. Whenever there was a new toy, like the tamagotchi, pogs, or pokemon, I knew better than to ask for one or play with them at friends’ houses (I did manage to scrape up enough money to buy an off-brand tamagotchi and a few pogs, however). We were forbidden to read books like Harry Potter, and we were never over at our friends’ houses alone, so there was not even a way to sneakily read these books or play with these toys.

Now that I’m an adult, of course, I’m experiencing a lot of things that people my age experienced in the 90’s. With the advent of Pokemon Go, I can finally discover this world, and part of the joy of experiencing this for the first time is that there is so much more available to me to show my love of Pokemon — plushies from Build-A-Bear, amigurumi patterns, and, I recently discovered, Pokemon cross stitch patterns.

While there is an option to scan in pictures and turn them into crochet patterns, I’ve had the best luck with the patterns I’ve found on DeviantArt — particularly from MakiBird-Stitching, who has several popular Pokemon cross stitch patterns available for free.

You can print them out in color or black-and-white and follow along with the key provided to make sure you’re using the right colors. The design is large enough to stand on its own (you could put the finished product in a frame or hoop to hang on the wall), but small enough that it isn’t intimidating to think about having to cross stitch.

This sort of project is perfect for someone on the go. It’s easy to stash in a bag and take with you on a road trip (especially during the holidays), or to work for something to do on your lunch break, or while you’re running errands. And if you have a cozy afternoon or long weekend at home, then you can enjoy turning these patterns into your own pokemon collection from the comfort of your armchair.

When cross stitching, the stitching itself is simple but it’s always important to have a planning stage prior to getting your needle and thread out. Make sure you have all the right colors and the materials (cross stitch fabric, a hoop, scissors, embroidery thread, the pattern), and that you follow along with the pattern exactly. You can highlight the stitches you’ve already done, if you like, or you can check them off.

After you’re done, you can choose whether you want to incorporate the piece into a larger project (as a badge, on a purse, as part of a book cover, etc.) or if you want to retain the piece as is and display it somewhere. Something like this would also make a great gift for fellow Pokemon fans of all ages, so you might want to make a few of these for special occasions like birthdays and Christmas.

If you’d like to peruse the Pokemon patterns available on DeviantArt, you can do so by visiting MakiBird Stitching’s page. Happy hunting!

30 total views, 3 today

Make This Tree Of Life Pendant With Your Favorite Crystals

Beading December 8, 2017

Make This Tree Of Life Pendant With Your Favorite Crystals

I began collecting crystals in 2015 after learning about chakras and what happens when they become unaligned. I have a particularly difficult time keeping my heart chakra aligned, and therefore have collected several green crystals such as jade, ocean jasper, malachite, green aventurine, green calcite, unakite, and chrysocolla. I’ve incorporated some of these crystals into jewelry, such as rings and bracelets. What I haven’t done yet, however, is incorporate one of my larger stones into a pendant.

That’s where this Tree of Life pendant comes into play. I’ve been scouring the internet looking for easy beading tutorials and stumbled across this beauty. the Tree of Life is a powerful symbol representing the “as above, so below” idea that is part of many religions around the world. It connects the underworld to our world, and our world to the heavens. It’s a potent image, one that carries a lot of weight and at the same time, much comfort.

If you’re familiar with the Tree of Life and would like to incorporate this into your own wardrobe, you can follow along with the tutorial provided by the Beading Tutorials site. Of course, you’ll need to make sure you have the following materials first: Artistic Wire (22 gauge as well as 24 gauge), a 51x49mm hoop (cast metal), a pendant of your choice (make sure it fits inside the hoop!), and some wire cutters and pliers.

What’s nice about this tutorial is that it isn’t too difficult for a beginner or intermediate beader. With the hoop you don’t have to create your own and worry about how the pendant will fit or how it will look (too thick, too thin, not sturdy enough, too big to handle with the pliers). You can instead jump straight into securing your pendant inside the hoop and then wrapping each section of the wire until it resembles the Tree of Life.

Beading Tutorials has a few pictures to complement their written tutorial, but the pictures are high quality and illustrate just what’s needed for each of the most important steps. Ensuring you have the proper materials will also go a long way to prevent frustration. You can of course experiment with different sized hoops, different colors of wire (try copper with blue or green crystals, gold with purple or black crystals, and silver with orange or pink crystals), and a variety of chains to attach the pendant to, but it’s best to follow the tutorial as closely as possible the first time so that you can get comfortable with the techniques before adding on another challenge.

Once you make the first one, you will most likely want to make more — they make excellent presents for special occasions such as holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries, and this jewelry isn’t necessarily feminine or masculine so can be presented to any gender. If you wrap the pendant and decide that you don’t want to incorporate it into a necklace, you can try it out as a bracelet, a keychain, or as a hair accessory.

If you’d like to read the whole tutorial, you can do so on the Beading Tutorials website. You can also find other jewelry tutorials, as well as a shop where you can purchase beads and other beading supplies.

28 total views, 3 today

Embroider Your Own Tiny Objects Like This Cute Book

Embroidery December 8, 2017

I remember the first time I was blown away by embroidery. I was in the library looking for fairytale stories when I came across a book called The Starlight Princess & Other Princess Stories. I flipped through the pages and saw that every illustration had been crafted from embroidery. It was mesmerizing, enchanting even. I later purchased the book and have it in my collection to show to friends who are interested in the fibre arts as well as fairytales. It got me started on my embroidery journey, and though I am not an expert, it is a wonderful skill that allows me to explore my creative side and pair it with my love of stories.

A few weeks ago I discovered that Wild Olive had an embroidery pattern that would fit my skills as a beginner and allow me to showcase my love of stories — a little book! With just a few simple stitches, a tiny hoop, and minimal supplies, you can create the perfect present for the librophile in your life — your favorite librarian, teacher, sibling, grandparent, or child. You can also customize this little pattern using various colors and adding special little flourishes such as a ribbon bookmark.

To make the little book, you’ll need a small hoop, the free PDF pattern (you can download it from the Wild Olive site — she also has several other book patterns as well as a way to incorporate these into larger crafts), some embroidery fabric (I tend to use linen), a pair of fabric scissors, five colors of embroidery thread (one for the book, one for the pages, one for the eyes and mouth, and two for the designs. The original uses blue, white, green, red, and black, but you can go for varying shades, pastels, earth tones, etc.), an embroidery needle, and a pencil.

The pattern utilizes a simple stitch and some knots, so if you aren’t familiar with embroidery knots you may want to look up a stitch guide just to make sure you are making them correctly. Once you have your materials, you’ll need to trace the pattern onto the fabric. I usually put the pattern and fabric against a window and trace that way, but if you have a drafting table with a light that’s the best option. You can also tape the fabric and paper against the window to keep both your hands free.

When the pattern is transferred, you can pick which colors you are using and start embroidering. You’ll want to start with the outline of the book, then the pages, then the decoration and finally, the face. If you want to add anything such as a bookmark, plan out where to put that in as well — probably before the front of the book is embroidered as you will want to arrange the bookmark.

Wild Olive has several other embroidery patterns as well, so if you enjoy this project you might want to bookmark the site and peruse the other patterns at your leisure. You can find the small book pattern here

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This Crochet Beanie Is Brimful With Cool (free pattern)

Crochet December 8, 2017

I remember when the beanie with a brim became popular. I wanted one so badly, but I wasn’t able to get one until college, and by then the fad had died down. Imagine my surprise and delight, then, when I discovered that these hats are making a comeback! I’ve spotted them in stores from Wal-Mart to REI, and I’m thrilled because now I can finally wear one and be in style. Of course, now that I’m able to knit and crochet, I’ve been scouring the internet for patterns and instead of purchasing one, I can crochet one in a few hours and customize it to my tastes.

Where I live we have a lot of cold weather, so a hat like this is perfect for stepping outside, whether it’s to run errands or go on a winter hike. The beanie part will keep your head warm, and the visor will help shield your eyes from the sun, which can be exceptionally bright in the wintertime, especially when it snows. Pair it with a cozy sweater, light jacket, or a scarf and you will be warm in any weather.

To make your own beanie with a brim, you’ll need the following supplies: one skein of yarn (the pattern suggests using Red Heart “Soft Yarn” but you can use any 4-weight yarn), a size “H” crochet hook, scissors, a tapestry needle, stitch markers, and either heavy interfacing or plastic for the brim. If you decide to forego those, the brim will be floppy. You will also want to check your gauge to ensure that the hat will be the right fit. A row of sixteen single crochet stitches should equal four inches. The only stitches needed are chain (ch), slip stitch (sl st), single crochet (sc), half double crochet (hdc), and double crochet (dc). Remember to use stitch markers and to ensure that you are crocheting on the correct side, whether it’s “Right Side” (RS) or “Wrong Side” (WS).

This pattern is marked “Easy” which means it’s perfect for beginners and intermediate crocheters. It doesn’t take very long (a few hours at most) and would make a great present for family members and friends, especially those who love winter activities like sledding, skiing, snowshoeing, and snowboarding. It’s a snug fit which means it won’t get lost easily, and unique enough that they won’t lose it in a jumble of snow-ridden clothes. You can also customize it by adding buttons to the sides of the brim, or a ribbon or strip of leather where brim meets beanie, or you can use variegated yarn to make it multicolored. You can also make a scarf, boot cuffs, or fingerless gloves to make a matching set.

Does this sound like the perfect hat for you or someone you know? If you’d like to make one or more of these stylish beanies, you can find the free pattern over at RedHeart.com. If you download the free pattern (which comes with a few pictures along with the written instructions), you will receive a 15% off coupon on your next online purchase — just remember to write down the code they provide.

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I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream For This Ice Cream Snuggle Sack (free pattern)

Crafts December 8, 2017

I’m lactose intolerant, so I don’t typically eat ice cream. That does not stop me, however, from enjoying all the adorable ice cream paraphernalia that abounds in the crafting community. Recently I was looking for a blanket pattern and stumbled across the cutest blanket ever — the ice cream snuggle sack from Bernat. Bonus, it was a free pattern so I downloaded it and looked it over.

While it is rated an “Intermediate pattern”, the only stitches you need to know are chain (ch), double crochet (dc), double crochet front post (dcfp), half double crochet (hdc), single crochet (sc), and slip stitch (sl st), which means that the stitches should be accessible to any level of crocheter. I think the reason it is labeled “Intermediate” is because it is such a huge project, and there are some tricky sections when switching colors for the ice creams.

That being said, if you are a beginner looking for a new challenge, you might find this one enjoyable, and the payoff is at the end you have a snuggly, cozy ice cream blanket that everybody will be screaming about. You can make it whatever colors you want, whether you prefer a sugar cone, waffle cone, or dipped cone; whether you like strawberry and vanilla, chocolate and butter pecan, or mint chocolate chip. Get creative about which flavors and toppings you love and add them to show off your preferences. You can even put a cherry on top. You can also add accessories to make it more “3-D”, such as buttons, lace, rickrack, ribbon, or beads.

The original pattern says it fits children 4-8, but it would also make a great lap blanket if you wanted to go that route. It would make a perfect gift for the ice cream and dessert lovers in your life, whether that’s a sibling, cousin, parent, or child. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with keeping it for yourself.

Take make one ice cream snuggle sack, you’ll need 16 skeins of yarn — 4 for the cone, and 6 each for the scoops. The pattern recommends using Bernat’s Baby Blanket yarn, along with a size “L” crochet hook and 3 stitch markers. You’ll also need a good pair of scissors and tapestry needle weave in the ends.

Be sure and read through the pattern beforehand — when I make the mistake of glancing over it and thinking that I’ve got everything in order, that’s when I mess up. I now tend to read the pattern fully first, then make note of whatever stitches I need to brush up on, go watch a few videos, and then gather the materials I’ll need for the project. That way I don’t get aggravated, and slowing down means I’ll make fewer mistakes.

Do you want more ice cream in your life without the brain freeze? Want to make someone’s naptime a bit sweeter? Then the Ice Cream Snuggle Sack might be just the thing. You can find the free pattern, along with some photos, on Bernat’s website. There are lots of free patterns there to inspire you and I recommend bookmarking the site or signing up for their newsletter if you want easy access to their library.

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